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8
May

The Alan Parsons Project – Eye In The Sky (1982) – €10,00

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Eye in the Sky is the sixth studio album by English rock band the Alan Parsons Project, released in June 1982 by Arista Records. At the 25th Annual Grammy Awards in 1983, Eye in the Sky was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album. In 2019, the album won the Grammy Award for Best Immersive Audio Album at the 61st Annual Grammy Awards.

Eye in the Sky provided the Alan Parsons Project with their first Top Ten hit since 1977’s I Robot, and it’s hard not to feel that crossover success was one of the driving forces behind this album. The Project never shied away from hooks, whether it was on the tense white funk of “I Wouldn’t Want to Be Like You” or the gleaming pop hooks of “Games People Play,” but Eye in the Sky was soft and smooth, so smooth that it was easy to ignore that the narrator of the title track was an ominous omniscient who spied either on his lover or his populace, depending on how deeply you wanted to delve into the concepts of this album. And, unlike I Robot or The Turn of a Friendly Card, it is possible to listen to Eye in the Sky and not dwell on the larger themes, since they’re used as a foundation, not pushed to center stage. What does dominate is the lushness of sound, the sweetness of melody: this is a soft rock album through and through, one that’s about melodic hooks and texture.

In the case of the spacy opening salvo “Sirius,” later heard on sports talk shows across America, or “Mammagamma,” it was all texture, as these instrumentals set the trippy yet warm mood that the pop songs sustained. And the real difference with Eye in the Sky is that, with the exception of those instrumentals and the galloping suite “Silence and I,” all the artiness was part of the idea of this album was pushed into the lyrics, so the album plays as soft pop album — and a very, very good one at that. Perhaps nothing is quite as exquisite as the title song, yet “Children of the Moon” has a sprightly gait (not all that dissimilar from Kenny Loggins‘ “Heart to Heart”), “Psychobabble” has a bright propulsive edge (not all that dissimilar from 10cc), and “Gemini” is the project at its dreamiest. It all adds up to arguably the most consistent Alan Parsons Project album — perhaps not in terms of concept, but in terms of music they never were as satisfying as they were here.

 

Side one
  1. Sirius (Instrumental) (1:48)
  2. Eye In The Sky (4:33)
  3. Children Of The Moon (4:49)
  4. Gemini (2:09)
  5. Silence And I (7:17)
Side two
  1. You´re Gonna Get Your Fingers Burned (4:19)
  2. Psychobabble (4:50)
  3. Mammagamma (Instrumental) (3:34)
  4. Step By Step (3:52)
  5. Old And Wise (4:52)

 

Notes
Release: 1981
Genre: Progressive Pop
Format: LP
Label: Arista Records
Catalog# 204666

Vinyl: VG
Cover: VG

Prijs: €10,00

7
May

Jim Steinman – Bad For Good (1981) – €15,00

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Bad for Good is the only studio album by American songwriter Jim Steinman. Steinman wrote all of the songs and performed on most, although Rory Dodd contributed lead vocals on some tracks.

The songs were originally intended to be recorded by Meat Loaf as a follow up to Bat Out of Hell, titled Renegade Angel. However, Meat Loaf suffered vocal problems and was unable to sing. He would record several tracks from Bad for Good for his later albums.

The first two songs, “Bad for Good” and “Lost Boys and Golden Girls”, were two of many songs written by Steinman under the inspiration of Peter Pan and lost boys who never grow up. This is reflected in lyrics in “Bad for Good” such as “You know I’m gonna be like this forever: I’m never gonna be what I should. The composer says that Peter Pan has “always been about my favorite story and I’ve always looked at it from the perspective that it’s a great rock ‘n’ roll myth because it’s about – when you get right down to it – it’s about a gang of lost boys who never grow up, who are going to be young forever and that’s about as perfect an image for rock’n’roll as I can think of.” “Lost Boys and Golden Girls” is the basis for the musical Neverland, which Steinman says is “a rock ‘n’ roll science fiction version of Peter Pan that takes place in a city built on the ruins of Los Angeles after a series of chemical wars.” Neverland never got past the workshop stage, although the stage musical Bat Out of Hell, scheduled to open in London in 2009, is based on the same concept.

The next track, “Love and Death and an American Guitar”, is a spoken word fantasy monologue, performed by Steinman that he used to do in the Meat Loaf shows. It opens by quoting lyrics from Bat Out of Hell’s “Paradise by the Dashboard Light” (“I remember everything. I remember every little thing as if it happened only yesterday. I was barely seventeen”), but instead of being “barely dressed” the protagonist “once killed a boy with a Fender guitar.” Influenced by The Doors, Steinman wanted to write a piece where “the rhythm wasn’t coming from the drums so much as the voice – the rhythm of the spoken voice and the heartbeat behind it.”

The final two tracks were originally packaged with the LP on an additional vinyl disc. “The Storm” is an orchestral piece. “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through” is, according to music website Sputnik Music, a celebration of “music being the only thing left to believe in, it is a cry to the musical gods, thanking them for the gifts they have been given.”

 

Side one
1.   Bad for Good  (8:45)
2.   Lost Boys and Golden Girls  (4:36)
3.   Love and Death and an American Guitar  (2:38)
4.   Stark Raving Love  (7:23)

Side two
1.   Out of the Frying Pan (And Into the Fire)  (6:12)
2.   Surf’s Up  (5:25)
3.   Dance in My Pants (duet with Karla DeVito)  (7:58)
4.   Left in the Dark  (7:58)

Extra EP
 1.   The Storm (4:28)
 2.   Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through (6:29)

 

Notes
Release: 1981
Format: LP
Genre: Hardrock
Label: Epic Records
Catalog# EPC 84361

Vinyl: VG
Cover: VG

Prijs: €10,00

6
May

Fischer Z – Going Deaf For A Living (1980) – €10,00

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Going Deaf for a Living is a 1980 album by Fischer-Z. This was the second album by Fischer-Z featuring the “classic line-up”. The guitar on this album was made more prominent, after their rather keyboard prominent debut. This album, as well the following Red Skies Over Paradise, are considered by fans as the best work to be produced by Fischer-Z. The album featured the singles “Room Service”, “Crazy Girl”, “Limbo” and the most popular “So Long”.

Going Deaf for a Living (1980) contains fewer keyboards than their debut Word Salad, but is equally likeable. There is a fast-paced but not punk-angry guitar-rock sound to half of the songs that resembles early X or Wire, and the reggae side of early Police. Lone hit “So Long” actually got onto MTV in the early days when they were still starved for product. Endearing low/mid-tempo song about rejection (what else?) pleases most who hear it. They keep it simple here like the Cars.

Side two gets a little repetitive, and Watts’ characters begin to devolve from the usual romantic losers into more long-term misanthropic ones. Note the transition from “Pick Up / Slip Up” to “Crank.” But the album ends with the short but blistering “Limbo,” which showed he still had some playfulness left in him.

The album is an unusual set of reggae tunes spiced with punk attitude to living. “No one’s young push me on much further beyond where I want to go. My foolish error was too care too much, I’ve got to keep my head down. I’ve reached my limit and I’m way past, way past going back. So why don’t you leave it out? Going deaf for a living”. The melodies are elaborately syncopated and inventively harmonious and in spite of prevailing reggae style Going Deaf for a Living is quite diverse.

 

Side one
1.  Room Service  (3:41
2.  So Long  (4:59)
3.  Crazy Girl  (4:26)
4.  No Right  (2:36)
5.  Going Deaf For A Living  (3:31)

Side two
1.  Pick Up/Slip Up  (2:37)
2.  Crank (3:06)
3.  Haters  (4:07)
4.  Four Minutes in Durham (With You)  (4:00)
5.  Limbo  (2:14)

 

Notes
Release: 1980
Format: LP
Genre: New Wave
Label: United Artists Records
Catalog# 1A 062-82867

Vinyl: VG
Cover: VG

Prijs: €10,00

5
May

Dr. Hook – Pleasure And Pain (1979) – €10,00

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Pleasure and Pain is the eighth album from the country rock band Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show. It featured two U.S. Top 10 hits, “Sharing the Night Together” and “When You’re in Love with a Beautiful Woman.

Consolidating their position as satin-clad seductors, Dr. Hook gets sweet and saccharine on Pleasure & Pain, a record that opens with the one-night-stand anthem “Sharing the Night Together” and ends with the novelty boogie “You Make My Pants Want to Get Up and Dance.” In between, Dr. Hook touch upon almost every other kind of quickie, celebrating infatuations, flirtations, and broken hearts, sometimes getting close enough to melancholy to register as a sadness but most of the time happy to sell heartbreak as seduction.

And so, Pleasure & Pain is supremely slick, a record designed to play in the post-Saturday Night Fever discos of 1978 and destined to remain in its time, and yet the sheer cravenness of Dr. Hook retains an inexorable appeal. These guys never attempted to be anything more than what they were: hippies happy to make the transition to polyester, just as long as they can keep bedding hot young things. The sleaze is appealing and alienating in equal measures and redolent of the late ’70s.

 

Side one
  1. Sharing The Night Together – 2:54
  2. Sweetest Of All – 2:40
  3. Storms Never Last – 3:21
  4. I Don’t Want To Be Alone Tonight -3:25
  5. Knowing She’s There – 3:26
Side two
  1. Clyde – 4:38
  2. When You’re In Love With A Beautiful Woman – 2:58
  3. Dooley Jones – 3:44
  4. I Gave Her Comfort – 3:14
  5. All The Time In The World – 2:34
  6. You Make My Pants Want To Get Up And Dance – 2:25

 

Notes
Release: 1978
Format: LP
Genre: Soft Rock
Label: Capitol Records
Catalog# 5C 062-85759

Vinyl: VG
Cover: VG

Prijs: €10,00

4
May

Massada – Astaganaga (1978) – €10,00

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Massada is een Nederlands-Molukse band uit Huizen opgericht door zanger/percussionist Johnny Manuhutu. De band scoorde in de jaren 70 en 80 van de 20e eeuw hits als Latin dance, Arumbai en Sajang é.

Astaganaga is het debuutalbum van de latin rock-band Massada. Het verscheen in april 1978 en werd opgenomen in de Telstar-studio in Weert. Het album – dat door de pers met Santana werd vergeleken – bracht de singles Dansa (Don’t quit dancing) en Latin Dance.

 

Side one
1.  Latin Dance  (3:17)  
2.  Sibu-Sibu  (7:54)  
3.  Sageru  (3:28)  
4.  Nanana Song  (7:00) 

Side two
1.  Beautiful Berimbau / Sleep My Love  (9:31)  
2.  Dansa (Don’t Quit Dancing)  (3:04)  
3.  Nena  (8:35)

 

Notes
Release: 1978
Format: LP (Gatefold)
Genre: Latin, Fusion
Label: Kendari Records
Catalog# KIL 21006 KL

Vinyl: VG
Cover: VG

Prijs: €10,00

3
May

Heart – Little Queen (1977) – €10,00

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Little Queen is the third studio album by American rock band Heart. It was released on May 14, 1977, by Portrait Records. The album was recorded and mixed at Kaye-Smith Studios in Seattle, Washington, from February to April 1977.

Heart’s follow-up to their phenomenally successful debut LP continues their curious marriage of bursting-at-the-seams hard rock and reflective, soft acoustic music. Understanding their meteoric rise is not that difficult—lead singer Ann Wilson, with her urgent, often explosive vocals, is the closest rock has to a female counterpart of Zeppelin’s Robert Plant (and anyway, Lord knows, we need many more women in rock & roll). Led Zeppelin influences abound, from Wilson’s “Summer-of-My-Smiles” phrasing on “Dream of the Archer” down to guitarist Roger Fisher’s Page-ish intro on “Go On Cry” and his ferocious riffing on “Barracuda” and the title track. The latter are the roughest and best tracks on the record.

Heart’s acoustic work is simply no match for their hard stuff; “Archer,” with its mesmerizing double-tracked mandolins, is the only nonrocker that works. The rest function as little more than diversions. The group also suffers from a lack of material; “Go On Cry” is simply some fancy guitar work fortified by a few wails from Wilson, yet it is the longest track on the record.

Dreamboat Annie proved that, in lean times, a few good songs can go a long way commercially, but three songs still don’t qualify an LP as a good one. While there’s little doubt that Little Queen will do well financially, Heart needs to realize the potential of its obvious talents if it seeks to gain a lasting audience.

 

Side one
1.   Barracuda   (4:21)
2.   Love Alive   (4:22)
3.   Sylvan Song (Instrumental)   (2:12)
4.   Dream of the Archer   (4:30)
5.   Kick It Out   (2:45)

Side two
1.   Little Queen   (5:10)
2.   Treat Me Well   (3:25)
3.   Say Hello   (3:36)
4.   Cry to Me   (2:52)
5.   Go On Cry   (5:53)

 

Notes
Release: 1977
Format: LP
Genre: Rock
Label: Portrait Records
Catalog# PRT 82075

Vinyl: VG
Cover: VG

Prijs: €10,00

2
May

The Rolling Stones – Black And Blue (1976) – €10,00

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Black and Blue is the 13th British and 15th American studio album by the English rock band the Rolling Stones, released on 23 April 1976 by Rolling Stones Records.

This album was the first recorded after former guitarist Mick Taylor quit in December 1974. As he had done the previous time the Stones were between second guitarists in 1968, Keith Richards recorded the bulk of the guitar parts himself, though the album recording sessions also served as an audition for Taylor’s replacement. Richards said of the album that it was used for “rehearsing guitar players, that’s what that one was about.” Numerous guitarists showed up to auditions; those who appeared on the album were Wayne Perkins, Harvey Mandel, and Ronnie Wood. Wood had previously contributed to the title track from the It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll album, and would become a full-time member of the Stones in 1976. The Stones rhythm section of bassist Bill Wyman and drummer Charlie Watts appear on nearly all tracks, and frequent collaborators Nicky Hopkins and Billy Preston play keyboards on most of the album, with percussionist Ollie E. Brown also appearing on about half of the tracks. The album was the second to be self-produced, credited to “The Glimmer Twins“, a pseudonym used by Jagger and Richards for their roles as producers.

Black and Blue showed the band blending its traditional rock and roll style with heavy influences from reggae and funk music. Only one single from the album, “Fool to Cry“, had any significant chart success, and reception to the album was mixed.

The two songs that are undeniable highlights are “Memory Motel” and “Fool to Cry,” the album’s two ballads and, therefore, the two that had to be written and arranged, not knocked out in the studio; they’re also the ones that don’t quite make as much sense, though they still work in the context of the record. No, this is all about groove and sound, as the Stones work Ron Wood into their fabric. And the remarkable thing is, apart from “Hand of Fate” and “Crazy Mama,” there’s little straight-ahead rock & roll here. They play with reggae extensively, funk and disco less so, making both sound like integral parts of the Stones‘ lifeblood. Apart from the ballads, there might not be many memorable tunes, but there are times that you listen to the Stones just to hear them play, and this is one of them.

In 2000 it was voted number 536 in Colin Larkin‘s All Time Top 1000 Albums.

 

Side one
1.  Hot Stuff  (5:20)
2.  Hand of Fate  (4:28)
3.  Cherry Oh Baby  (3:57)
4.  Memory Motel  (7:07)

Side two
1.  Hey Negrita  (4:59)
2.  Melody  (5:47)
3.  Fool to Cry  (5:04)
4.  Crazy Mama  (4:34)

 

Notes
Release: 1976
Format: LP (Gatefold)
Genre: Rock, Blues Rock
Label: Rolling Stones Records
Catalog# COC 59106

Vinyl: VG
Cover: VG

Prijs: €10,00

1
May

Paul McCartney & Wings – Red Rose Speedway (1973) – €10,00

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Red Rose Speedway is the second studio album by the British–American rock band Wings, although credited to “Paul McCartney and Wings”. The album was released by Apple Records in April 1973, preceded by its lead single, the balladMy Love“. By including McCartney’s name in the artist credit, the single and album broke with the tradition of Wings’ previous records. The change was made in the belief that the public’s unfamiliarity with the band had been responsible for the weak commercial performance of the group’s 1971 debut album Wild Life.

Before recording the album, Wings recruited lead guitarist Henry McCullough and released their debut single, “Give Ireland Back to the Irish“, which was banned by the BBC for its political message. Recording sessions for the album took place throughout 1972 at five different recording studios in London. The group also recorded the non-album singles “Mary Had a Little Lamb“, “Hi, Hi, Hi” and “Live and Let Die“, the last of which was issued in June 1973. Originally planned as a double album, it was condensed into a single LP at the request of EMI. The company believed that the material was not of a sufficiently high standard and were mindful of the modest sales of Wild Life and Wings’ first two singles. Members McCullough and Denny Laine later expressed disappointment in the choice of songs on the single album.

In early 1972, McCartney decided to expand Wings to a five-piece band by adding another guitarist, Henry McCullough, and to begin touring with the group. The band briefly toured British universities in February. They played in small halls, often unannounced, to avoid the media scrutiny that came with performing at more established venues.

Despite not releasing an album in 1972, Wings issued three singles while preparing their follow-up to Wild Life: “Give Ireland Back to the Irish“, which was banned by the BBC for its political sentiments; “Mary Had a Little Lamb“, based on the nursery rhyme; and “Hi, Hi, Hi“, which was banned by the BBC for drug references and sexually suggestive lyrics.

 

Side one
1. Big Barn Bed – 3:48
2. My Love – 4:07
3. Get on the Right Thing – 4:17
4. One More Kiss – 2:28
5. Little Lamb Dragonfly – 6:20

Side two
1. Single Pigeon – 1:52
2. When the Night – 3:38
3. Loup (1st Indian on the Moon) – 4:23
4. Medley: Hold Me Tight / Lazy Dynamite / Hands of Love / Power Cut – 11:14

 

Notes
Release: 1973
Format: LP (Gatefold)
Genre: Soft Rock
Label: Apple Records
Catalog# 1C 062-05311

Vinyl: VG
Cover: VG

Prijs: €10,00

30
Apr

Alexander O´ Neal – Alexander O´ Neal (1986) – €10,00

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Alexander O’Neal is the debut solo studio album by American recording artist Alexander O’Neal.
It was originally released in 1985 by Tabu and Epic. The songs were recorded during 1984 to 1985 in sessions that took place at Creation Audio in Minnesota, and Larrabee Sound in Los Angeles, California, assisted by R&B songwriting and record production team Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis.

Alexander O’Neal wasn’t as huge as Luther Vandross or Freddie Jackson; nonetheless, he was among the most exciting male R&B vocalists of the mid- to late ’80s.
Creatively and commercially, the soul man hit the ground running with this impressive debut album. It’s impossible to discuss Alexander O’Neal without mentioning the Time — O’Neal is an ex-member of that Minneapolis funk-rock combo, and so are the album’s producers (Monte Moir on three tracks, the Jimmy Jam/Terry Lewis team on the others). Also, former Time member Jelly Bean Johnson is heard on drums, percussion, and guitar.
But despite the participation of so many Time graduates, this release isn’t nearly as Minneapolis-sounding as it could have been.
The intoxicating funk hit “Innocent” is very Time influenced, but for the most part, O’Neal comes across as the epitome of a smooth, romantic soul man — sleek gems like “If You Were Here Tonight,” “A Broken Heart Can Mend,” and “What’s Missing” have more in common with Luther VandrossFreddie Jackson, and Kashif than with Prince or the Time.
While the solo albums that Morris Day and Jesse Johnson provided in the 1980s were consistently Time-minded, that isn’t the case with O’Neal‘s 1985 debut. Some people found that surprising, but then, O’Neal never actually recorded with the Time — when the Time recorded its first LP for Warner Bros. in 1981, O’Neal was long gone.
Excellent from start to finish, Alexander O’Neal is the singer’s most essential album.

 

Side one
1. A Broken Heart Can Mend – 3:45
2. If You Were Here Tonight – 6:10
3. Do You Wanna Like I Do – 4:49
4. Look At Us Now – 5:07

Side two
1. Medley: Innocent / Alex 9000 / Innocent II – 10:32
2. What’s Missing – 5:43
3. You Were Meant To Be My Lady (Not My Girl) – 6:31

 

Notes
Release: 1985
Format: LP
Genre: Soul
Label: Tabu Records
Catalog# TBU 26485

Vinyl: VG
Cover: VG

Prijs: €10,00

29
Apr

Rockwell – Somebody´s Watching Me (1984) – €10,00

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Kennedy William Gordy (born March 15, 1964), better known by his stage name Rockwell, is the son of Motown founder and CEO Berry Gordy and Margaret Norton. His father named him Kennedy William after John F. Kennedy and William “Smokey” Robinson. An American former musician and singer-songwriter who was signed to the Motown label. He is best known for his 1984 hit single “Somebody’s Watching Me“.

Somebody’s Watching Me is the debut studio album by singer-songwriter Rockwell, released in 1984 on Motown. It features the title track (with Michael Jackson on vocals in the chorus), as well as the US top 40 hit “Obscene Phone Caller“. However the next two singles, the power ballad “Knife” and a cover of The Beatles’ “Taxman” failed to reach the top 40.

After being kicked out of the house by his father, Motown founder Berry Gordy, Kennedy Gordy moved in with Ray Singleton, Gordy’s ex-wife. While living there, the younger Gordy began working on some music. Seeing the youngster’s potential, Singleton successfully lobbied to get Kennedy a staff writing job at Jobete.

One night, Singleton overheard Kennedy working on the track, “Somebody’s Watching Me” and believed it was a song worthy of recording. When Motown staff producer Curtis Anthony Nolen took an interest in the song, he was hired as the producer on the project. While working on the song in the studio, Kennedy got the idea to get Michael Jackson to sing on the track. Without indicating his plans, Kennedy picked Jackson up and drove him into the studio. Once Jackson was in the studio, Kennedy asked him to record the chorus with him. Jackson agreed.

Once the track was mixed, Singleton could not wait to play it for Berry Gordy, who thought one of the voices sounded familiar, but could not identify it. When Gordy found out it was Michael Jackson, he was elated.

Not wanting the Gordy name to influence the outcome of the song (his half-brother Kerry Gordy, recorded under his own name five years earlier without success), Kennedy decided to use the name Rockwell on the record. The title cut was one of the biggest singles of 1984 and both the album and single were certified Gold. It was easily the most successful record by a Gordy as a recording artist. Rockwell now gained an exalted position among the Gordy offspring

 

Side one
1. Somebody’s Watching Me  (5:01)  
2. Obscene Phone Caller  (3:24)  
3. Taxman  (3:56)  
4. Change Your Ways  (4:49)

Side two
1. Runaway  (4:24)  
2. Wasting Away  (3:55)  
3. Knife  (5:03)  
4. Foreign Country  (5:56)

 

Notes
Release: 1984
Genre: Soul / New Jack Swing
Format: LP
Label: Motown Records
Catalog# ZL-72147

Vinyl: VG
Cover: VG

Prijs: €10,00

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