Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Ellen Foley’ Category

27
Mar

Ellen Foley – Spirit Of St. Louis (1981) – Lp

Ellen Foley (born June 5, 1951) is an American singer and actress who has appeared on Broadway and television, where she co-starred in the sitcom Night Court. In music, she has released four solo albums but is best known for her collaborations with rock singer Meat Loaf.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist:  Ellen Foley
Title:  Spirit Of St. Louis
Year:  1981
Format:  LP
Label:  Epic Records
Catalog# EPC 84809

Spirit of St. Louis is the second studio album by American singer and actress Ellen Foley, released in March 1981. Foley is backed by The Clash on all songs. The album was recorded right after The Clash’s Sandinista! with the same musicians and engineers. Foley was dating Clash guitarist Mick Jones at the time. The album charted at #57 UK.

Ellen Foley evidently yearned to do something with more gristle than the rockist sturm und drang of her solo debut, Night Out. She got her wish, although titles like “The Death of the Psychoanalyst of Salvador Dali” surely puzzled fans who heard her breathless guest vocal on “Paradise by the Dashboard Light.” Ironically, the press focused more on the assistance rendered by Foley‘s steady, Clash guitarist Mick Jones (whose production is credited to “my boyfriend”). His other Clash-mates also appear, as do members of Ian Dury‘s backing band, the Blockheads; this impressive array of talent gives the album a unity it might otherwise lack. Jones and fellow Clash-mate Joe Strummer co-wrote six songs. The standout is “Torchlight,” a duet with Foley on which Jones drops some characteristically glistening guitar. “The Shuttered Palace” and “Theatre of Cruelty” also work well, logically upholding the Sandinista! era’s dense, intricate wordplay. The other Strummer/Jones efforts are less distinctive. “Salvador Dali” is little more than an impenetrable grocery list of free associations, “In the Killing Hour” is a sketchy throwaway that needed a stronger arrangement, and “M.P.H.”‘s bumptious pub rock is fun listening, but hardly a classic. Strummer‘s old busking mate, Tymon Dogg, contributes three killer tunes himself: his affectionate “Beautiful Waste of Time” is the best one, bolstered by an inspired Payne sax line. (The song originally appeared on Dogg‘s 1976’s self-released Outlaw Number One album.) Foley is less convincing on a stiff remake of “My Legionnaire,” but fares better on her own propulsive original, “Phases of Travel.” The sound is lush and dreamy, although a little more consistent material and less artsiness would have gone a long way. Clash fans impatient for the old three-chord thunder couldn’t stifle their yawns, so the album bombed.

 

Side one
1.  The Shuttered Palace   (5:06)
2.  Torchlight   (3:00)
3.  Beautiful Waste Of Time   (3:00)
4.  The Death Of The Psychoanalyst Of Salvador Dali   (2:42)
5.  M.P.H.   (3:30)
6.  My Legionnaire   (4:32)

Side two
1.  Theatre Of Cruelty   (4:04)
2.  How Glad I Am   (3:35)
3.  Phases Of Travel   (4:13)
4.  Game Of Man   (3:55)
5.  Indrestructible   (3:47)
6.  In The Killig Hour   (2:39)

http://www.ad-vinylrecords.com/product/foley-ellen-spirit-of-st-louis-lp/

7
Sep

Ellen Foley – Night Out (1979) – Lp

Ellen Foley (born June 5, 1951) is an American singer and actress who has appeared on Broadway and television, where she co-starred in the sitcom Night Court. In music, she has released four solo albums but is best known for her collaborations with rock singer Meat Loaf.

ellen-foley-night-out

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist:  Ellen Foley
Title:  Night Out
Year:  1979
Format:  LP
Label:  Epic Records
Catalog#  EPC 83718

Foley gained high public recognition singing the duet with Meat Loaf on the hit single “Paradise by the Dashboard Light” from the 1977 album Bat Out of Hell. Her debut album Night Out was released in 1979, and was produced by Ian Hunter and Mick Ronson.

The grand opener “We Belong to the Night” is breathtaking and bombastic bliss; a creamy confection of debonair dreams that could only come from the late ’70s and the glitter-gutter combo of Mick Ronson and Ian Hunter. The princely poppers provide the perfect atmosphere for Foley’s powerful theatrics on her inaugural flight. The second single, “What’s a Matter Baby,” soars just as high in the stratosphere: a little bit ’50s, but a whole lot cosmic. It’s a crime music which hides in the recesses of the past, because this gem is priceless, if only for the first two tracks. Ronson’s axe is exemplary throughout: shooting over Mars and then swooping back through nocturnal cityscapes. He twists “Heartful of Soul” into “Young Lust” and makes a break for it in “Hide Away.” Obviously haunted by midnight Spectors, kindred spirit Hunter supplies the perfect keyboard counterpart: mission control for Ronson’s rockets. The swirling storm whipping through Gram Parker’s “Thunder and Rain” builds to an almost unbearable compression of intensity. In the eye of this celestial storm, Foley scats, scolds, swoons, croons, pouts, pleads, and purrs in a rich tone that few femme fatales possess, scaling a towering wall of sonic seduction. The sublime proceedings finally slow down to a crawl for fallout “Don’t Let Go,” but it’s just the mourning after an unforgettable Night Out.

 

Side one
1.  We Belong to the Night  (5:24)
2.  What’s a Matter Baby (Is It Hurting You)  (3:47)
3.  Stupid Girl  (4:09)
4.  Night Out  (5:21)

Side two
1.  Thunder and Rain  (3:04)
2.  Sad Song  (3:31)
3.  Young Lust  (5:34)
4.  Hideaway  (3:50)
5.  Don’t Let Go  (3:56)

http://www.ad-vinylrecords.com/product/foley-ellen-nightout-lp/

%d bloggers like this: