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Posts from the ‘Supertramp’ Category

30
Apr

Supertramp – Even In The Quietest Moments (1977) – Lp

Supertramp (known as Daddy in 1969–70) are an English rock band formed in London in 1969. Though their music was initially categorised as progressive rock, they later incorporated a combination of traditional rock, pop and art rock into their music. The band’s work is marked by the songwriting of founders Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson and the prominent use of Wurlitzer electric piano and saxophone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist:  Supertramp
Title:  Even In The Quietest Moments
Year:  1977
Format:  LP
Label:  A&M Records
Catalog#  28600 XOT

Even in the Quietest Moments… is the fifth album by the English rock band Supertramp, released in April 1977. It was recorded mainly at Caribou Ranch Studios in Colorado with overdubs, vocals and mixing completed at The Record Plant in Los Angeles and was Supertramp’s first album to use engineer Peter Henderson, who would work with the band for their next three albums as well.

The title of Even in the Quietest Moments… isn’t much of an exaggeration — this 1977 album finds Supertramp indulging in some of their quietest moments, spending almost the album in a subdued mood. Actually, the cover photo picture of a snow-covered piano sitting on a mountain gives a good indication of what the album sounds like: it’s elegant yet mildly absurd, witty but kind of obscure. It also feels more pop than it actually is, despite the opening single, “Give a Little Bit,” their poppiest song to date, as well as their biggest hit. If the rest of the album doesn’t boast another song as tight or concise as this — “Downstream” comes close but it doesn’t have the same hook, while “Babaji,” a pseudo-spiritual moment that falls from the pop mark; the other four tracks clock in well over six minutes, with the closer, “Fool’s Overture,” reaching nearly 11 minutes — it nevertheless places a greater emphasis on melody and gentle textures than any previous Supertramp release. So, it’s a transitional album, nevertheless has plenty of fine moments aside from “Give a Little Bit,” including the music hall shuffle of “Loverboy,” the Euro-artiness of “From Now On,” and the “Fool on a Hill” allusions on “Fool’s Overture.”

 

Side one
1.  Give a Little Bit  (4:13)
2.  Lover Boy  (6:49)
3.  Even in the Quietest Moments  (6:31)
4.  Downstream  (4:04)

Side two
1.  Babaji  (4:51)
2.  From Now On  (6:21)
3.  Fool’s Overture  (10:52)

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20
Mar

Supertramp – Breakfast In America (1979) – Lp

Supertramp (known as Daddy in 1969–70) are an English rock band formed in London in 1969. Though their music was initially categorised as progressive rock, they later incorporated a combination of traditional rock, pop and art rock into their music. The band’s work is marked by the songwriting of founders Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson and the prominent use of Wurlitzer electric piano and saxophone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist:  Supertramp
Title:  Breakfast In America
Year:  1979
Format:  LP
Label:  A&M Records
Catalog#  AMLK 64747

Breakfast in America is the sixth studio album by the English rock band Supertramp, released on 29 March 1979 by A&M Records. It was recorded in 1978 at The Village Recorder in Los Angeles.

As with Even in the Quietest Moments…, Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson wrote most of their songs separately but conceived the theme for the album jointly. Their original concept was for an album of songs about the relationship and conflicting ideals between Davies and Hodgson themselves, to be titled Hello Stranger. Hodgson explained: “We realized that a few of the songs really lent themselves to two people talking to each other and at each other. I could be putting down his way of thinking and he could be challenging my way of seeing life […] Our ways of life are so different, but I love him. That contrast is what makes the world go ’round and what makes Supertramp go ’round. His beliefs are a challenge to mine and my beliefs are a challenge to his.”
This idea was eventually scrapped in favour of an album of “fun” songs, and though Davies initially wanted to keep the title Hello Stranger, he was convinced by Hodgson to change it to Breakfast in America. Hodgson commented later: “We chose the title because it was a fun title. It suited the fun feeling of the album.” Due to the title and the explicit satirising of American culture in the cover and three of the songs (“Gone Hollywood”, “Breakfast in America“, and “Child of Vision”), many listeners interpreted the album as a satire of the United States. Supertramp’s members have all insisted that the repeated references to US culture are purely coincidental and that no such thematic satire was intended. Hodgson has described the misconception as a parallel to how Crime of the Century (1974) is often misinterpreted as being a concept album.
“Gone Hollywood” is the opening track of Breakfast in America. Written by Rick Davies, the song tells about a person who moves to Los Angeles in hopes of becoming a movie star, but finds it far more difficult than he imagined—struggling and frustrated, until he ultimately gets his break and becomes “the talk of the Boulevard.” The lyrics were originally more bleak, but under pressure from the other band members, Davies rewrote them to be more optimistic and commercial.
“Child of Vision” is the closing track. Much like “The Logical Song“, it uses a Wurlitzer electric piano as the main instrument. After the lyrical part, the song goes into a long grand piano solo alongside the original Wurlitzer electric piano melody. The track fades out with a short saxophone solo by John Helliwell. Roger Hodgson has said that the song was written to be an equivalent to “Gone Hollywood”, looking at how Americans live, though he confessed that he had only a limited familiarity with US culture at the time of writing. He also said there is a slight possibility that he subconsciously had Rick Davies in mind while writing the lyrics.
Since all of Supertramp’s songs are contractually credited to both Davies and Hodgson, it is difficult to determine who actually wrote each song. Roger Hodgson’s management has described “The Logical Song“, “Breakfast in America“, “Take the Long Way Home“, “Lord Is It Mine” and “Child of Vision” as ‘Roger’s songs’; however, this apparently does not mean he necessarily wrote them by himself, as Hodgson has credited Davies with writing the vocal harmony on “The Logical Song“. Davies has referred to “The five songs that I did on Breakfast”, but does not specify which ones.

 

Side one
1.  Gone Hollywood  (5:14)
2.  The Logical Song  (4:08)
3.  Goodbye Stranger  (5:47)
4.  Breakfast In America  (2:37)
5.  Oh Darling  (4:01)

Side two
1.  Take The Long Way Home  (5:02)
2.  Lord Is It Mine  (4:04)
3.  Just Another Nervous Wreck  (4:22)
4.  Casual Conversations  (2:58)
5.  Child Of Vision  (7:23)

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30
Dec

Supertramp – Crisis? What Crisis? (1975) – Lp

Supertramp are an English rock band formed in London in 1969. Though their music was initially categorised as progressive rock, they later incorporated a combination of traditional rock, pop and art rock into their music. The band’s work is marked by the songwriting of founders Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson and the prominent use of Wurlitzer electric piano and saxophone.

supertramp-crisis-what-crisis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist:  Supertramp
Title:  Crisis? What Crisis?
Year:  1975
Format:  LP
Label:  A&M Records
Catalog#  89651 XOT

Crisis? What Crisis? is the fourth album by the English rock band Supertramp, released in 1975. It was recorded in Los Angeles and London – Supertramp’s first album to have recording done in the United States of America.
Having achieved commercial success with Crime of the Century (1974), the pressure was on for Supertramp to deliver a followup, and the record company pushed them to begin work as soon as the touring for Crime of the Century was finished. While touring the west coast of North America, Supertramp unintentionally gained extra time: Hodgson injured his hand, forcing the band to cancel the rest of the tour and leaving them with nothing better to do than work on the album. Despite this, the band still didn’t have time to rehearse for the album, and much like Indelibly Stamped (1971), songwriters Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson had no vision for a completed album worked out. Furthermore, the band’s busy touring schedule had left no time for writing songs, and so they entered A&M’s Los Angeles recording studios with only leftover songs from Crime of the Century (or even earlier) for material. Due to shortage of material, production had to be halted at one point so that Davies and Hodgson could write two new songs, one of which was “Ain’t Nobody But Me”.
Both the title and the concept of the cover were conceived by Davies, as John Helliwell recounted: “It was Rick that came up with the name Crisis? What Crisis? and one day, when we were sitting around Scorpio Studio, he came in with this sketch of a guy in a deck chair under an umbrella with all this chaos going on around him.” “Crisis? What Crisis?” is a line in the film The Day of the Jackal (1973). Artist Paul Wakefield returned after his work in Crime of the Century, photographing the backgrounds at the Welsh mining valleys, which were later composited with a model shot in the studio afterwards.
Hodgson was unhappy with the album, describing it as a rushed job with none of the cohesion of Crime of the Century. Bassist Dougie Thomson concurred: “We thought that the Crisis album was a little bit disjointed and the band as a whole at that time didn’t really like the album.”
Today, however, Roger Hodgson calls it his favorite album of Supertramp.

 

Side one
1.  Easy Does It  (2:18)
2.  Sister Moonshine  (5:15)
3.  Ain’t Nobody But Me  (5:07)
4.  A Soapbox Opera  (4:54)
5.  Another Man’s Woman  (6:15)

Side two
1.  Lady  (5:26)
2.  Poor Boy  (5:07)
3.  Just a Normal Day’  (4:02)
4.  The Meaning  (5:23)
5.  Two of Us  (3:27)

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29
Sep

Supertramp – Paris (1980) – 2Lp

Supertramp are an English rock band formed in London in 1969. Though their music was initially categorised as progressive rock, they later incorporated a combination of traditional rock, pop and art rock into their music. The band’s work is marked by the songwriting of founders Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson and the prominent use of Wurlitzer electric piano and saxophone.

supertramp-paris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist:  Supertramp
Title:  Paris
Year:  1980
Format:  LP
Label:  A&M Records
Catalog#  AMLM 66702

“Paris” is a live album by the English rock band Supertramp, released in 1980. It was recorded on Supertramp’s Breakfast in America tour in Paris, France, with most of the tracks taken from a 29 November 1979 show at the Pavillon de Paris, a venue which was once a slaughterhouse.

According to Roger Hodgson, Supertramp had several reasons to record a live album at the time, including a desire to introduce their pre-Breakfast in America works to USA listeners and a mutual sentiment that some of their songs were pulled off better live than in the studio. However, he admits that the chief purpose of the album was to buy time; the band was under pressure to produce a suitable follow-up to the immense success of Breakfast in America, and needed to get off the treadmill of touring and recording for a while in order to consider their direction for such an album. Taking such a breather meant the next studio album wouldn’t be finished until 1981 at the earliest, and so something was needed “to fill the gap.”

Using the band’s mobile studio, a number of shows in Canada and throughout Europe were recorded. However, when Pete Henderson and Russel Pope presented the band with unlabeled cassettes containing rough mixes of these recordings, and the members voted on their favourite tracks, the majority of votes coincidentally fell on recordings from the 29 November show at the Pavilion. A few tracks were taken from other concerts during the band’s stay in Paris, and studio overdubs were also added, chiefly for the vocals and John Helliwell‘s organ. However, Helliwell contended that the amount of overdubbing was minimal compared to most live albums of the time: “A lot of people, when they make a live album, just keep the drums and bass and redo everything else.” Filmmaker Peter Clifton shot the concerts in 16 mm film, missing only five songs (“A Soapbox Opera”, “You Started Laughing”, “From Now On”, “Ain’t Nobody But Me” and “Downstream”) to lower expenses and give the camera crew some rest. A&M Records requested music videos out of three songs, “Dreamer”, “The Logical Song” and “Asylum”. Clifton edited them along with Sarah Legon, and even extended his work to ten songs.

The album’s set list contains almost all of the 1974 Crime of the Century (except for “If Everyone Was Listening”), three songs from Crisis? What Crisis? (1975), two from Even in the Quietest Moments (1977), three from Breakfast in America (1979) plus “You Started Laughing”, the B-side to the track “Lady” from Crisis? What Crisis?.

 

Side one
1.   School  (Lead vocals: Roger Hodgson with Rick Davies)   (5:41)
2.   Ain’t Nobody But Me  (Lead vocals: Rick Davies)   (5:24)
3.   The Logical Song  (Lead vocals: Roger Hodgson)   (3:56)
4.   Bloody Well Right  (Lead vocals: Rick Davies)   (7:23)

Side two
1.   Breakfast In America  (Lead vocals: Roger Hodgson)   (3:57)
2.   You Started Laughing  (Lead vocals: Rick Davies)   (4:02)
3.   Hide In Your Shell  (Lead vocals: Roger Hodgson)   (6:54)
4.   From Now On  (Lead vocals: Rick Davies with Roger Hodgson)   (7:05)

Side three
1.   Dreamer  (Lead vocals: Roger Hodgson with Rick Davies)   (3:44)
2.   Rudy  (Lead vocals: Rick Davies plus Roger Hodgson)   (7:08)
3.   A Soapbox Opera  (Lead vocals: Roger Hodgson)   (4:51)
4.   Asylum  (Lead vocals: Rick Davies plus Roger Hodgson)   (6:51)

Side four
1.   Take the Long Way Home  (Lead vocals: Roger Hodgson)   (4:57)
2.   Fool’s Overture  (Lead vocals: Roger Hodgson)   (10:57)
3.   Two of Us  (Lead vocals: Roger Hodgson)   (1:25)
4.   Crime Of The Century  (Lead vocals: Rick Davies)   (6:31)

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